OGF Outcome Report

Download PDF

In  2011,  the  demand  for  democracy  and  better  governance  reached  the  streets  of  Tunis,  Homs,  Yangon, Washington and many other cities across the world. Millions of people participated in movements for democracy and  better  governance.  Not  only  have  they  demanded  democracy  in  countries  where  democracy  has  not  been well  established,  but  they  have  also  called  for  a  renewal  of  democratic  governance  processes  and  institutions for inclusive development and growth in countries with long established democratic traditions.


From  3-5  October  2011,  UNDP’s  Oslo  Governance  Centre,  together  with  UNDEF,  ActionAid,  ActAlliance,  PRIA, the  World  Bank  Institute  and  NORAD,  organized  the  Oslo  Governance  Forum.  The  Forum  brought  together 270 policy makers, experts and practitioners from more than 75 countries to discuss, from various perspectives, the  core  question  of  how  to  renew  democratic  governance  processes  and  institutions  for  a  new  era.  Or,  in  the words  of  Olav  Kjorven,  Assistant  Secretary-General  and  Director  of  the  Bureau  of  Development  Policy,  UNDP,
“How can governments be made more accountable to citizens? How can governance assessments contribute to citizens’ empowerment and more responsive democratic governance?”
The  Forum  provided  a  space  for  discussions  on  the  role  of  democratic  governance  assessments  in  developing anti-corruption  policies,  improving  public  service  delivery,  climate  change  mitigation  strategies,  post-crisis recovery  processes  and  in  promoting  democratic  change  processes  in  general.  These  issues  are  not  just fundamental  for  the  nascent  democracies  now  struggling  to  take  shape,  they  are  crucial  to  societies  further  in their transition.
The  objective  of  this  report  is  to  share  some  of  these  rich  experiences  by  presenting  a  summary  of  the  Forum’s main  deliberations  and   conclusions.  Futhermore  by  linking  the  11 ‘Oslo  Principles  on  Democratic  Governance Assessments’ (adopted at the end of the Forum) to a selection of cases, each highlighting one of those principles, this  report  also  aims  to  illustrate  how  these  principles  can  be  operationalized  and  thereby  contribute  to  better governance and, particularly, to improved social accountability.

 

 

 
From the Director of the DGG

Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi

Director of the Democratic Governance Group of the UNDP.

The success of the Oslo Governance Forum (OGF), from 1 to 3 October 2011, is a testimony to the innovative and cost-effective ways of organising a global advocacy event and creating a global venue that can enhance the credibility and capacity of UNDP to play a transformative leadership role on the global level.


The  clear message the emerged in the course of three days of discussions and debates (www.oslogovernanceforum.org) underscored that in the context of  economic, ecological and governance crises , UNDP is expected to play a more active, substantive and visionary leadership role  in strengthening Democratic Governance for sustainable development.
Implicit in the message  is the challenge that UNDP should be in the forefront, and at the cutting edge, of the nexus between democracy and development. It also serves as reminder that the UNDP, especially through its Human Development Reports, is that development is chiefly about communities and people beyond simple economic aggregates such as Gross National Product (GNP) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP).


The key question discussed and debated was how we can renew democratic governance processes and institutions for a new era?  This debate points to the belief as argued by Amartya Sen that development is freedom.  President Nelson Mandela noted that in taking on the transformation of society our goal was to banish hunger, illiteracy and homelessness and to ensure that everyone had access to food, education and housing. We saw freedom as inseparable from human dignity and equality.  He also remarked that overcoming poverty is not a gesture of charity, it is an act of justice.  It is the protection of a fundamental human right, the right to dignity and a decent life. While poverty persists, there are no true freedoms.
[...]

Read more...
 
Online Session Player

To view a webcast of select online sessions, select the day and name of the session below.

A copy of the Forum Program is available here.

 
Background Papers

 

 

 


OGC PAPER: SQUARING "GOVERNANCE ASSESSMENTS" WITH THE ACCOUNTABILITY AGENDA

By Ingvild Oia

SIDE EVENT REPORT: MAINSTREAMING HUMAN RIGHTS INTO GOVERNANCE ASSESSMENTS

by Dr Julia Häusermann

THE DEMOCRATIZATION OF GOVERNANCE ASSESSMENTS

by Alexandra Wilde

UNDP AND DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE ASSESSMENTS

by Alexandra Wilde and Joachim Nahem

UNDP Guidance Note on Fostering Social Accountability: From Principle to Practice

PARTICIPATORY GOVERNANCE ASSESSMENTS FOR REDD+ (PGAs)

UN-REDD Programme

WORKING PAPER FOR DISCUSSION: DEMOCRATIC SPACE IN ASIA-PACIFIC

By Lisa Horner and Andrew Puddephatt

ON HUMAN RIGHTS ASSESSMENTS (what's the goal? what's the purpose?)

By Bård Anders Andreassen and Hans-Otto Sano

EVIDENCE OF IMPACTS OF SOCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY/DEMAND FOR GOOD GOVERNANCE (DFGG) INITIATIVES: AN OVERVIEW

by Carmen Malena

CITIZENS' DEMAND FOR BETTER GOVERNANCE (SLIDES)

by John D. Clark

DISCUSSION PAPER: RESPONDING TO TRENDS IN DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE

UNDP


DARFUR LIVELIHOODS PROGRAMME: MAPPING AND CAPACITY ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIPONS (CSOs) IN DARFUR

Prepared by: Partners in Development Services (PDS)


CITIZENS’ FEEDBACK ON SERVICE DELIVERY FOR ACCELERATION OF THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS (SLIDES)

by Minar Pimple

ELBAG: ECONOMIC LITERACY & BUDGET ACCOUNTABILITY FOR GOVERNANCE (SLIDES)

By Ene Obi

FIGHTING CORRUPTION: A JOURNEY NOT AN EVENT - BOTSWANA'S STEPS (SLIDES)

By Nunu Seretse

ACCOUNTABILITY AND INCLUSIVE PARTICIPATION:A CIVIL SOCIETY PERSPECTIVE ON THE ROLE OF DONORS AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS (SLIDES)

By John Nduna

GOVERNANCE ASSESSMENTS AND SOCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY (SLIDES)

By Angelita Gregorio-Medel

MAKING A CASE FOR SAC IN GOVERNANCE ASSESSMENTS

By Angelita Gregorio-Medel

 


 
Secretary-General's message

The events of this year lend deep significance to the Oslo Governance Forum. Since the beginning of 2011, millions of people have participated in movements for democracy and better governance. Millions more have followed with intense interest as dramatic and often inspiring changes have been set in motion. The issues you have come together to discuss are critical to supporting and underpinning the efforts of these movements as they strive to turn their aspirations and early achievements into a working, lasting reality.


Read more...
 
From the Assistant Secretary General

Olav Kjorven

Assistant Secretary-General
UNDP

How can governments be made more accountable to citizens? How can governance assessments contribute to citizens' empowerment and more responsive, democratic governance? These are among the highly topical issues discussed at the Oslo Governance Forum Monday through Wednesday this week, among 270 policy makers, experts and practitioners from 75 countries. The Forum, organized by UNDP together with UNDEF, ActionAid, PRIA, the World Bank Institute and NORAD,  appears to be a smash hit with vigorous discussions around the Arab Spring, anti-corruption, improving public service, REDD, post-crisis recovery and more. Kudos to the Oslo Governance Center, the entire Democratic Governance Group and to fearless leader Geraldine for pulling this off, and thanks for the strong cross-practice contributions, including by CD Director Nils!

Read more...
 
The faces of OGF

Photos by Ashish Singh

More Pictures
Read more...
 
Making A Difference:

A country-led approach to democratic governance assessments

 

 

Good governance needs good data. Governance assessments are a mechanism to strengthen democracy. A successful assessment is driven by the country itself and carried out with the active participation of national and local actors. A country's engagement in the data collection process, analysis of results and ongoing monitoring add value to the assessment far beyond its findings.

This video captures the key aspects of a UNDP approach to democratic governance assessmentsm, and the potential of country-led approaches to foster national dialogue and social accountability.